Article

Planned use of long acting reversible postpartum contraception in low-risk women in CenteringPregnancy® group versus individual physician prenatal care

Authors: Sarah Bakir (University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa) , Tara Hoff (Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa) , Petra Hahn (University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa) , Colleen K Stockdale (Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa) , Abbey Hardy-Fairbanks (Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa)

  • Planned use of long acting reversible postpartum contraception in low-risk women in CenteringPregnancy® group versus individual physician prenatal care

    Article

    Planned use of long acting reversible postpartum contraception in low-risk women in CenteringPregnancy® group versus individual physician prenatal care

    Authors: , , , ,

Abstract

Introduction: Education on effective contraceptive methods is necessary during the prenatal period to help women achieve optimal birth spacing. This study identified rates of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) uptake in women who attended CenteringPregnancy® (CP) group prenatal care versus individual physician care (IP).

Methods: Charts for low-risk women who participated in group CP or IP prenatal care between March 2012 and May 2016 were reviewed. Charts of IP subjects were randomly selected in each year to achieve a CP:IP ratio of at least 1:3. The primary outcome was rate of LARC use at discharge and within 8 weeks postpartum. Pearson chi-squared test and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were performed, and a p-value <0.05 was considered significant.

Results: 129 women participated in CP care and 412 in IP care. CP women were more likely nulliparous (91, or 70.5% vs 212, or 51.5%, p=0.0001) and more likely to attend at least 15 prenatal visits (54, or 41.9% vs 62, or 15.1%, p<0.0001). LARC use rates at discharge and at the postpartum visit were similar (36, or 27.9% vs 89, or 21.6%, p=0.142; 39, or 32.2% vs 110, or 29.4%, p=0.557). Rates of women using effective contraception (LARC and other hormonal options, including oral contraceptives and Depo Provera) at discharge and at the postpartum visit were similar (59, or 45.7% vs 206, or 50.0%, p=0.177; 72, or 59.5% vs 229, or 61.2%, p=0.157). IUD use was greater than subdermal implant use in both groups (31, or 24.0% vs 5, or 3.9%; 72, or 17.5% vs 17, or 4.1%; p=0.081). Rates of routine postpartum visit attendance at 6-8 weeks postpartum were similar and high in both groups (121, or 93.8% vs 374, or 90.8%; adjusted p-value=0.164).

Conclusion: Although CP subjects had more prenatal visits and spent more time with providers, there was no difference on uptake of LARC or effective contraception at discharge or at the postpartum visit when compared to IP subjects.

Keywords: CenteringPregnancy®, group prenatal care, contraception, long acting reversible contraception, LARC

How to Cite:

Bakir, S. & Hoff, T. & Hahn, P. & Stockdale, C. K. & Hardy-Fairbanks, A., (2020) “Planned use of long acting reversible postpartum contraception in low-risk women in CenteringPregnancy® group versus individual physician prenatal care”, Proceedings in Obstetrics and Gynecology 10(1), 1-11. doi: https://doi.org/10.17077/2154-4751.1476

Rights: Copyright © 2020 the authors

Downloads:
Download pdf
View PDF

305 Views

128 Downloads

Published on
01 Nov 2020
Peer Reviewed
License
CC BY 4.0