Conference Proceeding

Human Factors Issues Associated with Limited Ability Autonomous Driving Systems: Drivers’ Allocation of Visual Attention to the Forward Roadway

Authors
  • Robert E Llaneras (Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, Blacksburg, VA)
  • Jeremy Salinger (General Motors, Blacksburg, VA)
  • Charles A Green (General Motors, Blacksburg, VA)

Abstract

This study characterized driver behavior and established a foundation for defining functional performance requirements associated with a Limited Ability Autonomous Driving System (LAADS) – a system capable of automated steering and speed/headway maintenance tasks on freeways, but does not relieve drivers of all driving tasks. The research was designed to examine and reveal potential issues associated with the use of semi-autonomous systems, exploring impacts on willingness to engage in secondary non-driving related tasks, and driver allocation of visual attention while operating under LAADS (ACC and Lane Centering). Results found meaningful differences in the allocation of visual attention across ACC and LAADS driving under situations where drivers were engaged in a secondary task. Overall findings suggest that given a rudimentary, but reliable, LAADS system (one which does not monitor or otherwise restrict behavior) drivers are likely to increase the frequency of secondary task interactions, and engage in risky tasks that are likely to increase extended glances away from the forward roadway.

How to Cite:

Llaneras, R. & Salinger, J. & Green, C., (2013) “Human Factors Issues Associated with Limited Ability Autonomous Driving Systems: Drivers’ Allocation of Visual Attention to the Forward Roadway”, Driving Assessment Conference 7(2013), 92-98. doi: https://doi.org/10.17077/drivingassessment.1472

Rights: Copyright © 2013 the author(s)

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Published on
18 Jun 2013
Peer Reviewed