Conference Proceeding

The Effects of Chewing Gum on the Driving Performance of Emergency Medicine Residents After Overnight Shift Work

Authors
  • Maricel Dela Cruz (Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Medical Toxicology, Drexel University College of Medicine)
  • Muhammad Masood Khalid (Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Medical Toxicology, Drexel University College of Medicine)
  • Ahmed Mostafa (Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Medical Toxicology, Drexel University College of Medicine)
  • Jeffrey Foster (Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Medical Toxicology, Drexel University College of Medicine)
  • Geoffrey Kaump (Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Medical Toxicology, Drexel University College of Medicine)
  • Rita G McKeever (Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Medical Toxicology, Drexel University College of Medicine)
  • Michael I Greenberg (Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Medical Toxicology, Drexel University College of Medicine)

Abstract

This is a comparison study evaluating the influence of chewing gum on driving performance by computer simulation in emergency medicine residents doing overnight shift work. A total of eleven subjects were tested. Four simulations were randomized to each test subject at different points in the study. Data was analyzed comparing pre- and post-shift tests for each study group, as well as chewing gum versus non-chewing gum use during testing. Results showed no significant difference in lateral deviation, described as the root mean squared of lane departure measured in feet, or braking reaction time, defined as the time to break measured in seconds when triggered by a predetermined cue, in those using gum versus no gum. Between- and within-group differences were assessed by split-plot analysis measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Our study showed statistical significance in that divided attention response time, designated as the time in seconds to perform a secondary task while driving, was longer in those driving with chewing gum versus without chewing gum (p < 0.05). This pilot study serves as a potential foundation for further investigation into augmenting the driving performance of emergency medicine residents performing overnight shift work with chewing gum use.

How to Cite:

Dela Cruz, M. & Khalid, M. & Mostafa, A. & Foster, J. & Kaump, G. & McKeever, R. & Greenberg, M., (2019) “The Effects of Chewing Gum on the Driving Performance of Emergency Medicine Residents After Overnight Shift Work”, Driving Assesment Conference 10(2019), p.120-125. doi: https://doi.org/10.17077/drivingassessment.1684

Rights: Copyright © 2019 the author(s)

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Published on
25 Jun 2019
Peer Reviewed