Conference Proceeding

Associations Between Cognitive Distortions in Moral Reasoning and Self-Reported Traffic Violations and Crashes for Different Road User Groups

Authors
  • Erik Roelofs (Cito)
  • Pierro Hirsch (Virage Simulation)
  • Jan Vissers (Royal Haskoning DHV)

Abstract

The use of self-serving cognitive distortions measured by traffic-role specific versions of the Cognitive Distortions in Driving (CDD) test was explored for three Dutch road user groups: cyclists beginning to learn to drive (LDs) who were enrolled in a pro-social driving program (n=138); young novice drivers enrolled in a safety awareness program (n=1660), and; experienced professional bus drivers enrolled in a post-licensing training program (871). Associations between cognitive distortions and self-reported traffic behavior, fines and crashes were analyzed. Results show that about 20 per cent of the young novice drivers used self-serving cognitive distortions, compared to 8 per cent of the LDs and 5 per cent of the bus drivers. In addition, use of cognitive distortions was significantly correlated with speed and traffic violations. Finally, a subgroup of cyclist LDs (n=38) who had been licensed for six months used fewer cognitive distortions when tested as drivers than the licensed young novice drivers without pro-social driver training. This shows that pro-social driver training can reduce cognitive distortions and may possibly increase safety.

How to Cite:

Roelofs, E. & Hirsch, P. & Vissers, J., (2019) “Associations Between Cognitive Distortions in Moral Reasoning and Self-Reported Traffic Violations and Crashes for Different Road User Groups”, Driving Assessment Conference 10(2019), 377-383. doi: https://doi.org/10.17077/drivingassessment.1721

Rights: Copyright © 2019 the author(s)

Downloads:
Download pdf
View PDF

50 Views

20 Downloads

Published on
27 Jun 2019
Peer Reviewed