Conference Proceeding

Comparing Performance when Using a New Style Large Touchscreen Compared to a Traditional In-Vehicle Touchscreen

Authors
  • Timothy Brown (National Advanced Driving Simulator)
  • Dawn Marshall (National Advanced Driving Simulator)
  • Neil Lerner (Westat, Rockville, MD)

Abstract

New in-vehicle touch screen displays are increasing in size and complexity, and the effect on distraction to the driver associated with their use is unclear. Large touchscreen displays, such as those in the Tesla, provide a richer display environment as well as a larger area compared to traditional in-vehicle touchscreens even when the same capabilities are available. This simulator study examines how performing the same tasks on two different types on in-vehicle displays impacts glance behavior, vehicle control and workload. Results show that the large touchscreen results in longer average glance lengths, a greater percentage of glances of more than 2-seconds, but fewer glances. For vehicle control, there were no differences in lateral control, but the large touchscreen showed less variability in speed and speed range overall, but not uniformly across the tasks. Drivers did not report different levels of workload between the two interfaces. The results point to the need for careful design to minimize the likelihood of long glances as vehicle design moves to larger displays.

How to Cite:

Brown, T. & Marshall, D. & Lerner, N., (2019) “Comparing Performance when Using a New Style Large Touchscreen Compared to a Traditional In-Vehicle Touchscreen”, Driving Assessment Conference 10(2019), 154-160. doi: https://doi.org/10.17077/drivingassessment.1689

Rights: Copyright © 2019 the author(s)

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Published on
25 Jun 2019
Peer Reviewed