Conference Proceeding

Safety Related Misconceptions and Self-Reported BehavioralAdaptations Associated With Advanced In-Vehicle Systems: Lessons Learned From Early Technology Adopters

Author
  • Robert E Llaneras (Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, Blacksburg)

Abstract

Early adopters of advanced in-vehicle technologies (Adaptive Cruise Control, night vision, park aid, and navigation systems) were interviewed in an effort to assess the extent to which drivers come to understand the performance capabilities and limitations of these types of advanced systems, and to understand how systems are influencing driver behavior (modifying behavior in potentially positive or negative ways). Despite access to a wide array of information about their in-vehicle system, responses to knowledge-based questions about the systems themselves suggest that key information was not necessarily acquired nor understood by a large number of drivers. Many drivers held misconceptions about the performance capabilities of their advanced systems, suggesting that drivers’ mental models of how these systems function and perform do not always match reality. For example, 99% of ACC system owners did not know that the system ignores stopped vehicles. Similarly, 41% of park aid system owners did not know that the system warning is tied solely on the distance to objects and does not take into account their closing speed. Self-reported data also provided evidence of behavioral adaptations. Results suggest that additional efforts are needed to increase driver understanding of how these systems operate, particularly for safety-related aspects.

How to Cite:

Llaneras, R., (2007) “Safety Related Misconceptions and Self-Reported BehavioralAdaptations Associated With Advanced In-Vehicle Systems: Lessons Learned From Early Technology Adopters”, Driving Assessment Conference 4(2007), 299-305. doi: https://doi.org/10.17077/drivingassessment.1253

Rights: Copyright © 2007 the author(s)

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Published on
11 Jul 2007
Peer Reviewed