Conference Proceeding

Does Exposure to Distraction in an Experimental Setting Impact Driver Perception of Cell Phone Ease of Use and Safety?

Authors
  • Angela Garabet (Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety Hopkinton, MA)
  • Andrea J Horrey (Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety Hopkinton, MA)

Abstract

We examined drivers’ perception of the ease and safety of cell phone use while driving before and after exposure to distraction in an experimental setting. During the study, each driver reflected on driving and task performance while engaged in conversation-like and arithmetic distraction tasks on a handsfree and hand-held cell phone. Hands-free phones were consistently rated easier to use and safer than hand-held cell phones by both age groups, despite equivalent decrements in driving performance. Younger drivers consistently rated cell phones to be easier to use and safer than did older drivers. After exposure to distraction, younger drivers’ perception of the ease of use declined relative to their initial ratings; however, there was no corresponding change in the ratings of safety. In contrast, older drivers’ perception of ease or safety did not change significantly post-exposure. A priori subjective ratings on various dimensions of driver skill and distraction were also examined with respect to age-related differences.

How to Cite:

Garabet, A. & Horrey, A., (2007) “Does Exposure to Distraction in an Experimental Setting Impact Driver Perception of Cell Phone Ease of Use and Safety?”, Driving Assessment Conference 4(2007), 387-393. doi: https://doi.org/10.17077/drivingassessment.1266

Rights: Copyright © 2007 the author(s)

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Published on
11 Jul 2007
Peer Reviewed